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   Author  Topic: G.T.K.Y.G. - Topic: Book Club  (Read 3534 times)
Philly
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G.T.K.Y.G. - Topic: Book Club
« on: Nov 13th, 2002, 9:19pm »
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IMPORTANT Addendum by admin
 
Fellas,
 
Remember that the "main" point here is "for us to get to know YOU better by way of talking about/recommending books", not so much to get to know books better through you (a line I myself am really going to have to make a concerted effort to toe on this thread). I really want that to be our focus. The idea of our truly getting to know each other on at least somewhat of a substantive level is what's at the "heart" of this place. Let's try not to get sidetracked by, albeit sometimes inherent, peripheral aspects of the discussion. Let's always "bring it back". Anyway, given the nature of this topic, ALL the different kinds of books there are, "what 'a book' is", I don't think we need to follow any type of top 10 format with this one. Philly's "Book Club" format is more fitting. So without further ado,...

 
------------------------------------------------------------------------  
 
Here is Philly's original post that he started this thread with way back:
 
I've just finished reading a series of mystery/detective novels where the hero/protagonist is a sports agent. Lots of sports references to keep things interesting, but most of all it is a fun, easy read. The characters are interesting and there are lots of laughs.
 
Author: Harlan Coben
Books: 1. Deal Breaker 2. Drop Shot 3. Fade Away 4. Back Spin 5. One False Move 6. The Final Detail 7. Darkest Fear
 
*Be sure to read them in order. There are lots of references to previous events in each subsequent novel.
« Last Edit: Apr 25th, 2004, 3:58pm by Stegfucius » Logged
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Re: Get to know your Gridironers - Topic: Book Cl
« Reply #1 on: Oct 30th, 2003, 4:32pm »
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Unfortunately I don't get the time to read that I once did, and also admit that as an English major in college, I didn't read as much as I should have. When I do get the read, now, it is generally something quick and easy for entertainment purposes only...
 
Nevertheless, I wanted to get this thread going a bit with a few books that made me think and have stayed with me. I'll be sure to add more later...
 
A Separate Peace - John Knowles
I remember having to read this book as a freshman in high school. I was a disinterested student at the time and hated any assigned books before even reading them. This book, however, managed to draw me in. I've read the book more than a dozen times now, and am probably due to pick it up again soon. The characterization of Gene and Phineas is unparalleled. They are the closest of friends and their need for each other drives them to utter contempt for each other. Knowles is able to take the events of the time, bring them directly to the walled-in secrecy of a private boarding school, and develop a story filled with truth.
 
High Fidelity - Nick Hornby
I happened upon this book by chance, just going through my local bookstore and reading the backs of many before choosing one. I read the book and enjoyed it, then put it aside and forgot about it. Then I saw that the book had been made into a movie a few years later and couldn't remember too much about the book, so I re-read it before seeing the movie. The novel is a story of Rob and his recent breakup with a long-time girlfriend. While that sounds sappy enough, the book is filled with laughs, especially from Barry and Dick and their "Top 5" lists for any occasion. The novel is also filled with truths about relationships that seemed to hit a bit too close to home at times. Hornby's male-confessional writing style keeps the reader begging for more.
 
The Secret History - Donna Tartt
A high-brow novel that is at times creepy and hilarious. Richard, an insecure student is drawn to a group of scholars that all share a love of Classic Greek. The group is led by a reclusive professor who has earned the contempt of his peers because of his methods and beliefs. The students' devotion to their professor leads them to re-enact a bacchanal in the woods with tragic results. Richard learns the group's secret and cannot help but be drawn deeper and deeper into their circle. Many classic allusions that at times can become annoying and pedantic, but a top-rate psychological thriller nonetheless.
 
« Last Edit: Oct 30th, 2003, 4:33pm by Philly » Logged
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Re: Get to know your Gridironers - Topic: Book Cl
« Reply #2 on: Oct 30th, 2003, 6:06pm »
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I am a real generally a real simpleton when it comes to books, or I skew to a type of book not many other people would read. While at the beach I read 2 of the Larry Bond War Books. You know the type, Japan decides they are are going to invade China. They do really well because their technology advances are so much better than any one else. Then the US 'hero' manages to save the day by some creative technique.
 
When it comes to the other books, the last thinking book I read was DUEL: A History of Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr. Being a history major, I really find this book interesting. It examines the the lives of these two men. It truly portrays what scums our founding fathers were. And trust me, they played VERY dirty politics and led very scandalous lives. The role that these two men played in American History is fascinating.
 
 
I DIGRESS...
    And while talking about History, I am going to digress for a second. I went to Philadelphia this past weekend. I took some great tours of the lesser known spots of history in Philadelphia. I am so amazed how life was back then. I also took a tour of the new Constitution Center. Go see it!!!
     
    It really is INCREDIBLE foundation the Constitution is. Honestly, I was almost in tears seeing what our country has become based on a single document altered 27 times.(technically, 17) Everything our country is and represents is in one simple document.  The whole experience really made me appreciate what a great place we live in.

« Last Edit: Oct 30th, 2003, 6:08pm by DirkDiggler » Logged

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Re: Get to know your Gridironers - Topic: Book Cl
« Reply #3 on: Oct 31st, 2003, 10:52pm »
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Forgive me fellow gridironers for I am with sin.
 
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Re: Get to know your Gridironers - Topic: Book Cl
« Reply #4 on: Nov 1st, 2003, 12:59am »
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I think all the best books are from my youth..  because i too have become wrapped up i this fast paced and video oriented world.
 
Lord of the flies.  Really made me think and I thought in some weird way that it would be cool to be way out on your own like that.
 
the green Mile...  Stephen King is an amazing author
 
the only book I read three times as a youngster was American Physc by Bret Easton Ellis.......this was made into a movie a couple years back.  the movie did not do the book justice.  This book really made me think about how people can be so different than you really now.  In other words think for yourself and just don't trust anyone.
 
My Bible...and the Chronicles of Narnia by C.S Lewis.  I think alot of people have read these and they are great for an array of ages.
 
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Re: Get to know your Gridironers - Topic: Book Cl
« Reply #5 on: Nov 1st, 2003, 1:49pm »
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on Oct 31st, 2003, 10:52pm, steelkings wrote:
Forgive me fellow gridironers for I am with sin.
 
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Nothing wrong with putting some baseball books down on your list.  I think one of the things that makes these threads work (this thread and the movie thread) is that people explain something about the book/movie and how/why it is on the list - in the process the other members here get a chance to know more about you through your selections.
 
 
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Re: Get to know your Gridironers - Topic: Book Cl
« Reply #6 on: Nov 1st, 2003, 1:56pm »
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on Nov 1st, 2003, 12:59am, Noey21 wrote:
Lord of the flies. Really made me think and I thought in some weird way that it would be cool to be way out on your own like that.

 
This book is one that may make my list when I continue it.  It shows how close our civilization is to the savage roots from whence it developed thousands of years ago.  It really makes you think a bit more deeply about the perceived innocence of children and our society in general.
 
I think many people's favorite books are books from their youth.  That is when most of us were forced to read the classics.  It's rare that someone picks up a classic when they get older.  And there are so few classics being written today amongst the thousands of other titles.
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Re: Get to know your Gridironers - Topic: Book Cl
« Reply #7 on: Nov 16th, 2003, 8:48pm »
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Well, I am going to go about this in a couple different ways. As a lover, and wanna-be scholar (for those of you in the know, you get what I am gettin' at there), of Philosophy, I am going to fall back on giving a Top 10 list of Philosophy books that I love and have heretofore positively influenced my life. After that, I am going to throw a few odds and ends out there in a more "book club" type way. First the Top 10 list:
 
(I give exact publishing companies because those are the editions that I find to be the best.)
 
#10 A Brief History Of Time, by Stephen W. Hawking, Bantam Books - Not a Philosophy text strictly speaking, but not really a Science text either; Philosophy of Science, a key area of the discipline, I would say. It really makes "physical realities" make sense in "more" layman's-ish terms. If you want to talk about "truth" or "the Truth", you just gotta deal with this stuff.
 
#9 Crossing The Threshold Of Hope, by Pope John Paul II, Alfred A. Knopf - Again, not a Philosophy text strictly speaking, but Religion and Philosophy go hand-in-hand. As long as you can "deal with" the dogma, the powerful mind of one of the greatest, yet most unheralded, "Philosophical thinkers" of our time shines brightly in this book. Many philosophically-important concepts get covered from a contemporary perspective.
 
#8 Groundwork Of The Metaphysic Of Morals, by Immanuel Kant, translated by H. J. Paton, Harper Torchbooks - This is the "categorical imperative" book... VERY difficult read, but one that probably has influenced my general philosophical outlook more than any other. It's a Philosophy classic... perhaps to a fault, but still key.
 
#7 The Marx-Engels Reader, by Karl Marx and Frederick Engels, edited by Robert C. Tucker, Norton - EVEN MORE difficult of a read and MUCH LONGER, but WELL worth a year's worth of reading, while commuting by train or bus or something, at least through page 500, The Manifesto of the Communist Party, and even that your just reading because how can you read Marx and not read The Communist Manifesto, which is one of his signature works, but in all frankness, surely not among his best. His later works, of which that would be included are much weaker than his earlier works: that's kind of where he went from social and economic philosopher, which he was awesome at, to political scientist and revolutionary, which he wasn't very good at.
 
*#6 The Conquest Of Happiness, by Bertrand Russell, Bantam Books - One of the greatest, if not "the (long 'e')" greatest, layman's Philosophy books by a GREAT and fairly contemporary Philosopher. It touches upon many foundational points of Philosophy, BUT does it in as about as pragmatic a way as can be done "philosophically".
 
#5 The Confessions Of Saint Augustine, by St. Augustine, translated by Edward B. Pusey, Collier Books - Okay, back to the tough stuff. It's like reading Philosophy's version of The Cantebury Tales, i.e. BRUTAL. However, after reading this book AND "getting it", the way you think about "time" will "forever" be altered (especially if you read this after having read something like #10 above).
 
*#4 What The Buddha Taught, by Walpola Rahula, Grove Press - The (long "e") BEST book on the "basics" of Buddhism HANDS-DOWN! Comprehensive overview, fairly easily readable, absolutely logical presentation. After reading this and thinking it through, you cannot help but "see" the "beautiful logic" of Buddhism.
 
*#3 The Enchiridion, by Epictetus, translated by Thomas W. Higginson, Macmillan Publishing - You had to know one of the ancient Greek guys were going to show up on this list eventually. Well, this guy is actually Roman. Could be considered the father of Roman Stoicism. One of the best features of this "manual" from a practical perspective is that it's VERY SHORT and the translation is very smooth, though I'm sure not ambient. You can read this sucker in a day, EASY. Practical Philosophy that you will not go away from the same person.
 
#2 The Way Of Life, by Lao Tzu, translated by Wittner Bynner, Perigee Books - You had to know for Steegie-san the book above wasn't going to be it for the Eastern Philosophy stuff. This is a classic. Not an easy read to "get" the first time around if you read it quickly. It can be read in a day or two, but it CANNOT be "gotten" that quickly. This is a book that should rock your world regarding the fundamental philosophical concepts of "society", "being", "individuality", "nature", "accumulation (of wealth, e.g.)" and MUCH more when you "get it".
 
#1 Winter Notes On Summer Impressions, by Fyodor Dostoevsky, translated by David Patterson, Northwestern University Press - VERY tough and "sophisticated" read. It shares something VERY in common with #2: it can easily be rifled through; it's not that long and seems quite readable, but is not AT ALL easy to "get". His sarcasm is like quicksand. I write A LOT of notes right on the pages when I read, and there are pages in my copy of this book that are just littered with pen-black or highlighter-yellow cross-outs because I misinterpretted what he meant. One of the greatest things about this book is that during both the Czarist and Soviet regimes in Russia, Philosophy was VERY RARELY, actually basically never, written "as such". Basically, all of Russian Philosophy is contained in and conveyed by way of Russian Literature. All of Dostoevsky's famous works are novels like The Brothers Karamasov and the Philosophy is conveyed in sequences like The Grand Inquisitor in that book. This reality is what makes Winter Notes... so special. It is written as a socio-economic commentary/critique of Europe, especially France, but it is dripping in Philosophy. It is about as close to a raw work of Philosophy coming out of Russia before, well, 1991 as you will find. And, it, once "gotten", will totally blow your mind with regards to many ideas fundamental to Philosophy and, of course, life, ranging from "brotherhood" to "accumulation (of wealth, e.g.)".
 
Along the lines of more of a "Book Club" recommendation, for budding Philosophers out there, most of the books above I would NOT recommend starting out with. The book I would absolutely recommend starting out with (and now I don't mean this condescendingly)... You know the IDG Books "Dummies" series of "reference" books? ... Computers for Dummies, Science for Dummies, etc., etc... Well, they have a Philosophy for Dummies by Thomas Morris. It is a superb and easy read and it's not at all fluff. It covers a wide range of important philosophical concepts in a, believe it or not, fun and entertaining way and you will surely go away thinking, understanding more and really wanting to take the next steps *(which you could take with perhaps any of the ones with asterisks above... I would suggest the Bertrand Russell book, #6 on the list, to be your next step).
 
Some other stuff worth sharing, I am not a big fan of classic American literature, actually don't like novels much, period, but I do have a soft spot for Russian Literature. Worthy of mention are Maxim Gorky's Mother, Valentin Rasputin's Farewell to Matyora and most of all Vasili Klyuchevsky's Peter The Great, which is not fiction, but it's not really non-fiction, either. It's "embellished" history, not that the life of Peter The Great needs much embellishing. This book is an awesome "tale" of one of the greatest leaders and "characters" the world has known... and, for that matter, one of the world's good guys.
 
Along the lines of something Philly/Jeff touches on above regarding children's books, I would also like to mention that a second #1 book for me that I am not inclined to put on a "Top 10" list precisely because of the way it is popularly looked upon is Antione de Saint Exupery's The Little Prince. It is considered a classic children's book. It really isn't, though: I mean it's surely classic, but it definitely ain't just for children. The language is not that simple; the story is not easy to follow, and the concepts are actually quite heavy. I even know this from experience. I tried teaching it to a sixth grade class... Didn't work! Seriously, this is a book with honest-to-goodness early Marxist-type (as opposed to late Marxist) themes.
 
As for as of late, I am reading The Art Of Happiness by The Dalai Lama. I am maybe about a fifth of the way through, and it has been an inspirational read. Again, though, for budding philosophers, I would steer you toward the book mentioned above by Thomas Morris. This would be a book worth tackling after that and a couple of the asterisked (say that three times fast... I can't even say it once) ones above.
« Last Edit: Nov 19th, 2003, 1:25am by Stegfucius » Logged
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Re: Get to know your Gridironers - Topic: Book Cl
« Reply #8 on: Dec 10th, 2003, 12:18am »
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Finally getting around to getting listing my top 5. I am going with series instead of actual single books. I don't do alot of non fiction reading since I work in law enforcement. I do alot of science fiction reading (it's my escape from reality) and here are my top 5 all time series:
 
5. Forgotton Realms Dragonlance Series by Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman.  
 
This is a fantastic series with many interesting characters, with my favorite being Raistlin the mage. His inner struggles and the sacrifices he made to become a magician is one of the storylines of the series. Epic battle between good and evil dragons is the central storyline with many other smaller ones weaving throughout the three series of three books each.
 
4. The Lord of the Rings, by J.R.R. Tolkein
 
Pretty much everyone has heard of this series by now with the fantastic movie trilogy that wraps up this month with the release of the third movie, The Return of the King. The movies have been awesome and follow the books pretty well. Follow Frodo the Hobbit and his inner struggle to rid the world of the one ring. Great story, great characters. If you have not seen the movies, do it now!
 
3. The Dark Elf series by R A Salvatore
 
My favorite character in any book. Drizzit Do'Urden, the drow elf. The only drow with a heart and with morals, he leaves the underground world to find nothing but hatred and ridicule towards him. He finds solace in a land called Icewin Dale and fins a few friends, including a dwarven king name Bruenor Battlehammer. Together, Drizzit and his friends find many adventures. Great series.
 
2. The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant the Unbeliever by Stephen R. Donaldson
 
Thomas Covenant is a leper. Recently split from his wife, he lives a lonely secluded life. Until one day when he loses consciousness and drifts off into a fantasy land. A land where his white gold wedding ring carries enormous power. He becomes the reluctant hero, battling the evil Lord Foul. I have read both series over and over again. Great books...
 
1. The Shannara Series, by Terry Brooks
 
This man is in my opinion the greatest fantasy writer ever. Starting with the Sword of Shannara to his most recent work, Jarka Ruus, Brooks fills the pages with extraordinary characters, from Allanon, to Garret Jax, to the King of the Silver River to the Ohmsfords. His series of writings span several centuries in the Four Lands. Starting with Shea Ohmsford, the small boy and unkowning savior of the lands, to Grianne Ohmsford, the former Ilse Witch turned Ard Rhys, leader of the Druids, the Ohmsford family is central to all of the novels.
If you like fantasy novels and have never read any of Brooks' work, do so. You won't be sorry!  
« Last Edit: Dec 10th, 2003, 6:12am by BarnabyWilde » Logged

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Re: Get to know your Gridironers - Topic: Book Cl
« Reply #9 on: Dec 10th, 2003, 9:39am »
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I read some Fantasy Fiction when I was in high school, but haven't gone back to the genre since that time...
 
A couple series that I remember enjoying were:
 
The "Myth" series by Robert Lynn Asprin.
 
The "Thieves' World" series, edited by Robert Lynn Asprin - a series of short stories (novellas, really) by masters in the field using the same setting and characters.
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Re: G.T.K.Y.G. - Topic: Book Club
« Reply #10 on: Jul 15th, 2004, 1:55pm »
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Picked this goodie off "The REAL Feed"...  It regards Robert Smith's very cleverly-titled book:  "The Rest of the Iceberg: An Insider's View on the World of Sport and Celebrity".  I've always admired Robert Smith a lot for his focus on education over sport.  He retired off my GBRFL team, helping my "BLACKSmiths" win a GBRFL title in what turned out to be his last season.  He definitely is a man "who there is more to" and one who takes the road less traveled (surely vis-a-vis others in similar shoes to his).  Here is the piece from "The REAL Feed":
 
http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=1839937&CMP=OTC-DT970520 4233.
 
At least the article is worth a read.  I am going to try to fit the book in someday.  My reading load is about to get quite heavy here, though, soon.
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Re: G.T.K.Y.G. - Topic: Book Club
« Reply #11 on: Oct 30th, 2004, 4:15pm »
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I add this here now (finally) in relation to a post I am going to make on the Politics thread.  ...
 
Before heading back to grad school, I promised myself that I would finish off a couple readings.  I got through Frederick Copelston's third volume of his A History of Philosophy.  As regards you guys here, eh...  Volume III, though, with its coverage of Medieval philosophy has been VERY helpful to me here at Catholic U., though, needless to say.  I am familiar with names, chronology of things and modes of thinking I would have not been had I not made it through it.  ...  Of, perhaps, more relevance to you all, I read Douglas Groothuis's (ironically, out of Denver Seminary right down the road from the University of Denver) On Jesus from the Wadsworth Philosophers Series, which I would highly recommend to any budding philosophers out there, who are seeking the wisdom and temperance of philosophy.  Nice, not overwhelming, introductory material.  Anyway, this presentation of Jesus qua philosopher vis-a-vis qua Savior gave an un"usual" take and offered some decent, digestable food for thought.  It starts out pretty, well, "God-awful", so to speak, in its dryness, but picks up by chapter four.  Anyway, that was the last of my "independent" readings for a while worth sharing...
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Re: G.T.K.Y.G. - Topic: Book Club
« Reply #12 on: Nov 13th, 2004, 5:39pm »
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Copleston is extremely handy.  Great stuff.
 
By the way, I have nearly every volume (the old volumes: smaller, printed in the 60's) if you need to borrow one sometime.
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Re: G.T.K.Y.G. - Topic: Book Club
« Reply #13 on: Dec 20th, 2004, 3:59pm »
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Well, at this point might as well start getting these offseason topics rolling along...
 
...
 
A book our nation as a whole could REALLY stand to experience... C. S. Lewis's The Abolition of Man! I read it for one of my classes. It is a classic; it is a "cultured" and yet not difficult read; it is short and very well-worth the (few hours you'd spend) read(ing it). For those disposed a bit to the "right", which, by the way, I think for the "average" American is the "actual" middle (even though the FAR left makes it seem otherwise), it may seem a bit too far right in a couple respects, but, OVERALL, the "eyes" of America REALLY need to get the in"sight" contained in it in "view" and incorporate it in their paradigmatic "view"points about the world. Out with the daily "throw-away" writing of newspapers and magazines (which, very literally, are done, oftentimes moot and, in any event, in the garbage can at the end of the day) and in with classics which have stood the test of time and really make you think, and from which you can really learn something (useful).
 
I would highly recommend the publication we were assigned. It is the 1974 one published by HarperCollins. For one, the "homemade"-looking cover gives it a very authentic and solid feel. The ISBN # is 0-06-065294-2.
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Re: G.T.K.Y.G. - Topic: Book Club
« Reply #14 on: Jan 11th, 2005, 10:01pm »
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Yeah, that is a great book, Steg.  Another great read of C. S. Lewis's is his "The Case for Christianity," Part I, which is a defense of natural morality from the standpoint of reason alone.
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Re: G.T.K.Y.G. - Topic: Book Club
« Reply #15 on: Jul 31st, 2005, 11:51pm »
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Spent the day at the beach today, Bradley Beach for those who know the Jersey shore well, and finished one of the best best-sellers in a while,... a PHILOSOPHY book, On Bullshit by Harry G. Frankfurt, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at Princeton University.  It's about a two-hour to two-and-a-half-hour read.  I say that long because you do have to stop and re-read certain sections and think some of the ideas through. You could do it in 45 or so minutes, I suppose, but if so, you probably did not get out of it ALL that there is to learn and come to understand.  The book is about a HUGELY important contemporary social issue, but, mind you, it IS philosophy. It is NOT just some "poppy", merely time-sensitive work.  In the book, in VERY short, he points out that the dangers of bullshit or bullshitting are, first and foremost, that it has NO relation to or respect for (the) truth (of things) or reality (the way things in fact really are), words/statements that provide no truth-value, which, then, causes people to lose sight of the truth, that there even is truth; this ("bullshit" skepticism), in the end, is very habit-forming/it easily becomes a way of life (and has in America, which provides a system and social context that sets the stage for the proliferation of bullshit and bullshitters).  One of my FAVORITE quotes is on page 62.  It echoes something I've basically been shouting from the rooftops here for almost three years now.  He writes that bullshit "arise(s) from the widespread (American) conviction that it is the responsibility of a citizen in a democracy to have opinions about everything..."  ...  This is a TOTALLY AWESOME, fairly quick and yet VERY thought-provoking MUST-read!!!  It's a chance to read a REAL philosopher philosophize vis-a-vis another pop-cultural figure opine.
 
Another book I recently finished,... Y'shua - The Jewish Way To Say Jesus by Moishe Rosen.  Another insightful, quick read.  It's not the most "academic" read by any stretch of the imagination.  If you were really taken by what he presents and think that there is something to what he's got to say worth investigating or at least considering as a reasonable point of view (which I do), you really would have to follow it up with (objective) research of your own.  Anyway, it presents, from the (unique, somewhat forgotten and yet oh so authentic) viewpoint of Messianism, which comes from/is a transliteration of the Hebrew (for all intents and purposes, another way of saying Christianity, which is derived from the Greek translation of the Hebrew), i.e. Messianic Judaism.  I am very intrigued by this religion.  They were ultimately the original "Christians", the first believers in Christ the Savior, even though their history is not wrought like the Catholic Church's.  As for me, I don't know where I ultimately stand on ultimate religious truths.  BUT, this book, better and more cogently and concisely than any other I've read, presents the position of acceptance.  Chapter 7 is particularly good.  It gives a summary of Sir Robert Anderson's interpretation, or should I say extrapolation, of Daniel 9:24-26, in which the arrival of Jesus in Jerusalem is prophesized.  It is a very tedious, arcane and complex passage requiring meticulous interpretation, the kind which Anderson was devoted to and Christian/Messianist scholars and clerics rejoiced over.  Rosen goes about giving a wonderfully pithy summary of this all (which I have had explained to me by a born-again Christian... quite laboriously and "uncogently").  ...  Anyway, it too is another worthwhile read, if for no other reasons than it can be gotten for FREE and it's doable in a short period of time.  Depending on how fast you read as few as three hours may be all you will need and even for us slow readers I would say no more than eight.
 
Next up, before school commences, I'm taking on a book I've been wanting to read/treat myself to since it came out 11 years ago, The Death of Common Sense by Philip K. Howard.  I just started it.  It's already a goodie!
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Re: G.T.K.Y.G. - Topic: Book Club
« Reply #16 on: Jan 6th, 2006, 6:54pm »
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Well, today, just in time, the last Friday before spring semester commences and any personal reading has to be laid aside, I finished Mitch Albom's The Five People You Meet In Heaven.  Has anybody else read this?  WOW!!!  And, (as per the above as yous know) I'm not much of a story reader...  Give me the hardcore philosophy! Anyway, I started it on Sunday and had a hard time putting it down when I just had to so as to do the other things life requires. BY ALL MEANS, pick this up for yourselves and get the box of Kleenex ready (at least for the end run). It's a VERY worthwhile QUICK read.  I'm still also working through The Death of Common Sense (as per my last post).  I gotta say, between that, this and On Bullshit, the last three books I've read/been reading, you've got three not all too time-consuming reads that are jam-packed with (if you are open to it, LIFE-ALTERING) WISDOM, each of a different (but not mutually exclusive) sort!!!  If I were to pull a Phil Jackson on yous, I would be doling out these three books to you all.  ...  When I open those FantasyFootballer.com offices someday (on the Big Island of Hawaii (a phrase which interestingly can be read correctly in two different ways ) or the Rocky Mountains of Colorado or wherever),... I just may... ... ...
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Re: G.T.K.Y.G. - Topic: Book Club
« Reply #17 on: Jan 6th, 2006, 11:07pm »
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on Jan 6th, 2006, 6:54pm, StegRock wrote:
I finished Mitch Albom's The Five People You Meet In Heaven. Has anybody else read this?

 
I've got it but have not started it yet...heard it was good
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Re: G.T.K.Y.G. - Topic: Book Club
« Reply #18 on: Jan 6th, 2006, 11:15pm »
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on Jan 6th, 2006, 11:07pm, MordecaiCourage wrote:
heard it was good

 
That's putting it mildly... "Good" is NOT NEARLY strong enough of a word. Read it, MC,... a.s.a.p. If you are open to it's message (I think you would be), it can be life-changing or, at least, perspective-adjusting.
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Re: G.T.K.Y.G. - Topic: Book Club
« Reply #19 on: Jan 20th, 2006, 11:50pm »
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I am not the reader I once was...I guess Fire Science, Hazardous Materials, National Electric Codes, DoD Tech. Orders, and NFPA Standards have killed the joy of reading for me over the last 20 years!! On the rare (getting rarer) occasion I get to read something outside of technical manuals, I find most of that time being spent in Scripture. Back in the day I enjoyed Kurt Vonnegut books (especially Slaughterhouse Five), Og Mandino's "The Greatest" series, and any of the old classics like the "Red Badge of Courage", "Call of the Wild", "Gulliver's Travels", "Treasure Island" etc. etc. I enjoy Robert Frost and Ralph Waldo Emerson. I also enjoyed "I Am Third" by Gale Sayers. If you notice there is no new print listed. It's not that I haven't read anything new...I just do not find the joy in it anymore. Sad
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Re: G.T.K.Y.G. - Topic: Book Club
« Reply #20 on: Jan 23rd, 2006, 4:22pm »
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I just finished The 5 people you meet in heaven. Its good. Im ready for discussion.
 
Im starting "Dinner with a perfect stranger"
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Re: G.T.K.Y.G. - Topic: Book Club
« Reply #21 on: Jan 24th, 2006, 12:22am »
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on Jan 23rd, 2006, 4:22pm, steelkings wrote:
I just finished The 5 people you meet in heaven. Its good. Im ready for discussion.
 
Im starting "An invitation to dinner"

 
As per my post from the 6th of Jan. I have the book in my possession......but I still have not even broke the cover. When I do I will be there.
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Re: G.T.K.Y.G. - Topic: Book Club
« Reply #22 on: Apr 17th, 2006, 6:57am »
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Dinner with a perfect stranger =
 
tuesdays with Morrie = Great read. After talking with many people, I have found that Im the only one in the USA that hasent seen the movie. And....the movie follows the book well. Darn the luck.
 
Reading : Blink, The power of thinking without thinking.
 
I should be really good at not thinking!
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Re: G.T.K.Y.G. - Topic: Book Club
« Reply #23 on: Apr 17th, 2006, 11:21pm »
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my wife just picked up the five people you meet in heaven, guess i will have to read it soon.
 
authors i read alot:
 
chuck palahniuk - fight club, etc.
robert parker - spencer for hire based on his books
robert mccammon - the earlier books are better
stephen hunter - espionage and guns
stephen king - the best
larry niven/jerry pournelle - scifi
 
i read almost any and everything when i get the chance but it seems to be mainly escapism fiction.
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Re: G.T.K.Y.G. - Topic: Book Club
« Reply #24 on: Apr 21st, 2006, 7:00am »
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Currently Im reading the "GAME OF SHADOWS "You gotta love that Berry Bonds. He makes T.O look like a choir boy. I have a family member who has a true run in with good ole Barry "Juicey" Bonds.
 
Of course you probably have figured out that my roots are located in western P.A. I have a currently 83 year old grandmother inlaw who was sitting in a box seat along the wall just inside of third base back during Bonds last year as a Pirate in three rivers stadium. That would make her about 73 at the time. There was a shallow fly ball that "Juicy" made a diving catch with 2 outs and bags loaded. As he was trotting back to the dug out by my grandmothers box she exclaimed. "Atta boy!". "Juicy" stopped and replied." Who in the fuck are you calling boy, How would you like it if I called you an old bitch". He then turned and trotted away.
 
Needless to say, Barry will never be confused with the likes of Clemente, Stargell ect.. as great former Pirate players.
« Last Edit: Apr 21st, 2006, 7:01am by steelkings » Logged
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